CPU Cage Window Box, Take 2



CPU Cage Window Box, Take 2
Originally uploaded by sindy

Last year, I replaced my office PowerMac G5 tower with a 20″ iMac and re-purposed the CPU cage on my desk. Well, as you can see, the 20″ iMac is gone now too and I’ve moved to a MacBook, but I digress… Rather, over the course of a year, out of three planted, the bottom spider plant flourished while the top two died. You see, only the bottom one had any exposure to sunlight– I have a corner cube and the window is behind and to the left of my desk. Plus, I don’t even have overhead lighting because I had the fluorescent lighting removed over my office (preferring ambient natural light during the day or incandescent light when dark outside instead– trust me, it’s easier on the eyes, especially when you’re staring at a computer screen for hours). And we know it’s the lighting issue because the schefflera that sits directly in the corner window is completely out of control and grows like a weed.

In any case, after some huddling, we decided to plant a new spider plant to replace the two we lost (may they rest in peace) and implement a new overhead lighting scheme. The tools: a clip on lamp I bought during junior year in college (I have been waiting seven years to find a use for that thing) and a special GE Plant Light Bulb. Now, my original thought was that it would compensate for lack of sunlight (based on the advice of the supposed resident houseplant expert in the office), but the production information reads:

The GE Plant Light bulb is tinted blue to highlight the natural beauty and color of your plants — so they appear healthier and greener.

Now, I don’t know if it’s an issue of just bad wording or fear of making guarantees, but I don’t know if appearing healthier and greener is the same thing as actually being healthier and greener. Photographing someone with soft focus resulting in a picture of them looking younger doesn’t actually make them younger. In any case, we’ll see what happens. Hey, if it works, maybe we’ll start growing some “herbs.”